Texas students may be required to pass citizenship test to graduate

House Bill 1776 would replace a U.S. history course that students take at the end of a semester with a test that immigrants take to get their U.S. citizenship.

SAN ANTONIO - Lawmakers are considering a bill that would require high school students to pass a civics test in order to graduate. House Bill 1776 would replace a U.S. history course that students take at the end of a semester with a test that immigrants take to get their U.S. citizenship.

But, unlike the real civics test, the test for students would be multiple choice.

On Wednesday, the Texas House tentatively approved the bill. Supporters say that the bill’s goal is to ensure that students are proficient in U.S. history.

KENS 5 quizzed a handful of adults to see how they fared.

We pulled 10 questions from a U.S. Customs and Immigration Services practice exam. Among the questions:

Who would serve as president if the current president and vice president could longer serve?
Who was president during World War I?

"I think it should be required for all the students to learn. I had to learn it when I was a kid at school," Larry Davis said.

"If the people coming into our country have to take it, why can't our kids take it?" Darin Zediker said.

Based on the answers we received, a majority of the people we talked to would’ve passed the test. But some may not have passed.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services requires immigrants to correctly answer 6 out of 10 questions from the list of 100 questions in English. If you'd like to test your U.S. history, click here.

© 2017 KENS-TV


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