Limes blamed for girls' second-degree burns - KYTX CBS 19 Tyler Longview News Weather Sports

Limes blamed for girls' second-degree burns

Posted:
  • CBS19.tv Web ExclusivesMore>>

  • Web Exclusive: Ultra HD TVs

    Web Exclusive: Ultra HD TVs

    (CNN) -Some people just have to have the latest in television technology. The newest TVs on the market- ultra-high definition TVs- or UHD TVs. They have higher screen resolution than current high def screens, and are also known as "4-K" sets. "More >>
    (CNN) -Some people just have to have the latest in television technology. The newest TVs on the market- ultra-high definition TVs- or UHD TVs. They have higher screen resolution than current high def screens, and are also known as "4-K" sets. "More >>
  • Web Exclusive: A product to help keep sharks away on sale

    Web Exclusive: A product to help keep sharks away on sale

    Monday, July 28 2014 9:40 AM EDT2014-07-28 13:40:46 GMT
    If you're headed on a beach vacation, there's a product you may be interested in to help keep sharks away.  The device is called a Shark Shield.  It is now being sold in Florida.More >>
    If you're headed on a beach vacation, there's a product you may be interested in to help keep sharks away.  The device is called a Shark Shield.  It is now being sold in Florida.More >>
  • Web Exclusive: Back to School costs really add up

    Web Exclusive: Back to School costs really add up

    Friday, July 25 2014 9:14 AM EDT2014-07-25 13:14:59 GMT
    Before you know it, fall will be here and it will be time to go back to school.  For parents that means stocking up on notebooks, number two pencils, and back to school clothes, all of which usually take a big chunk out of a family's budget.  So, just how much do parents will pay to send their kids off to school this year?More >>
    Before you know it, fall will be here and it will be time to go back to school.  For parents that means stocking up on notebooks, number two pencils, and back to school clothes, all of which usually take a big chunk out of a family's budget.  So, just how much do parents will pay to send their kids off to school this year?More >>

Courtesy ABC News

Five young friends from Fresno, Calif., are nursing second-degree burns caused by a dangerous mix of two summertime staples: sun and citrus fruit.

Jewels, Jazmyn, Bailey, Candy and Reyghan, aged 7 to 11, were smashing limes with rocks and adding the juice to soda – a warm weather activity that seemed innocent enough. But the next day all five girls had blistering burns over huge swaths of skin.

"It hurt so bad," said 11-year-old Jewels, who described the pain as the "probably the worst" in her life. "It felt like there was a hundred needles just going in one spot."

Sun Protection: Fact or Fiction

The burns were so painful that the girls' parents rushed them to the hospital.

"A parent's worst nightmare is watching your kid scream and cry and begging you to stop the pain. And there is absolutely nothing you can do for your child," said Reyghan's mom, Melinda McDaniel.

All five girls were diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis, a form of skin irritation brought on by a reaction between photosynthesizing chemicals found in citrus fruits and ultraviolet light from the sun.

"UV light changes the structure of the chemicals and causes a toxic reaction on the skin," said Dr. Dawn Davis, a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

The severity of the reaction depends on the amount of chemical on the skin and the duration and intensity of sunlight exposure, according to Davis. And while the pain and inflammation typically subside in a matter of days, phytophotodermatitis can cause skin pigment changes that linger for weeks or months.

"We never thought lime can burn our skin like acid," said Jewels, whose sister Jazmyn was also suffered second-degree burns.

Summer Dangers: Don't Let Your Child Get Hurt

The burns can be seen on the girls' arms and legs, sometimes in patterns of splashes and drips.

"We often see streaking patterns because juices from fruits tend to drip," said Davis, adding that bartenders are particularly prone to phytophotodermatitis. "If you spill something that contains lime, you can see spill or splash mark on the skin."

The girls also have burns on their faces from "daring each other to drink the lime juice," according to 9-year-old Bailey Kinser, who joked about the strange name of their surprising condition. "I'm all, phytophotodermatitis what?"

But ABC News' chief health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser said the condition is more common than people realize.

"It can be anywhere from a mild rash where you see darkening of the skin to something quite severe like big blisters like these girls had," he said. "The only advice around this is if you've been handling limes, wash your hands before you go out in the sun."

And wear sunscreen, which can act as a chemical barrier to the sun's UV rays and a physical barrier to lime juice, according to Davis.

Although their skin is still healing, the girls are back in school saying they've learned their lesson.

"I'm done with limes," said Jewels.

Read on ABC News

Powered by WorldNow

CBS19, MYTX & KCEB
2211 ESE Loop 323
Tyler, TX 75701
Phone (903) 581-2211
Fax (903) 581-5769

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KYTX. All Rights Reserved. Users of this site agree to the Terms of Service, Privacy Notice/Your California Privacy Rights, and Ad Choices.