x
Breaking News
More () »

Tyler's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Tyler, Texas | CBS19.tv

Dangers of extreme heat for children, pets

"Your mind is elsewhere, putting on your mask, getting ready to go out, you're in a hurry, you run into something, don't even think about the quiet baby in the back.

TYLER, Texas — The hotter it is outside, the more of a threat it is for people and pets. Once you get in your car it may feel as if you were in a sauna. Hotter temperatures are sure to come this summer. 

RELATED: Child hot car deaths decreasing to record lows amid COVID-19 outbreak

RELATED: Austin parents of 5-month-old who died after day care incident warn of sleeping dangers

According to AAA, last year, 52 children in America died from being left in a hot car.  So far this year, 8 children have died in hot cars, according to the National Safety Council.

"Your mind is elsewhere, putting on your mask, getting ready to go out, you're in a hurry, you run into something, don't even think about the quiet baby in the back and they can be very dangerous." Public Information Officer with Tyler PD, Andy Erbaugh, said. 

Credit: CBS 19

With the windows cracked, temperatures can reach 125 degrees. High body temperature, altered mental state or behavior, sweating, nausea and vomiting, flushed skin, heavy breathing, racing heart rate and headache are all symptoms of a heat stroke. People aren't the only ones to suffer in the sun.

RELATED: TIPS: Preventing hot car deaths

"We do get more of the you know, pet left to vehicle calls than we do the child left in the car calls," Erbaugh said.

Farm animals can also suffer from extreme heat if left outside for too long. Excessive drooling, panting, dry nose, vomiting and warm to the touch are some signs your pet is having a heat stroke. 

Credit: CBS 19

Think about this, if it's extremely hot for you, it's hotter for your animal. If your pet is experiencing any of those symptoms, take them to your veterinarian as soon as you can.