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TONIGHT: Last full moon of the summer to light up the sky

The autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere, the official beginning of fall, occurs on Wednesday, Sept. 22.

TYLER, Texas — The last full moon of the summer will illuminate the sky Monday night.

East Texans should see the Harvest Moon peak around 6:55 p.m.

While the full moon will be on Monday from Iceland, Liberia, and Senegal westward across the Americas to the International Date Line, it will be on Tuesday for the rest of Africa and Europe eastward across Asia and Australia to the International Date Line, NASA reports.

The autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere, the official beginning of fall, occurs on Wednesday, Sept. 22.

On Tuesday morning, as the opening act to the fall season, a strong cold front will make its way to East Texas. As it does, it'll bring a round of showers and thunderstorms. Behind the front, winds will gust as high as 25-30 miles per hour Tuesday afternoon and evening, as drier air begins filtering into East Texas.

This will leave us morning lows in the 50s and afternoon highs in the low to mid-80s for the rest of the week.

One Moon, Many Names

As the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, this is the Harvest Moon, an old European name. The Oxford English Dictionary gives 1706 as the year of its first published use. Farmers sometimes need to work late by the light of the Moon for the harvest.

According to NASA, on average, the full moon rises about 50 minutes later each night, but around the Harvest Moon – moonrise seems to be at nearly the same time - just 25 to 30 minutes later across the northern United States, and only 10 to 20 minutes later farther north in Canada and Europe.

Other European names for this full Moon are the Fruit Moon, as a number of fruits ripen as the end of summer approaches, and the Barley Moon, from the harvesting and threshing of the barley.

The Maine Farmers' Almanac first published Native American names for the full Moons in the 1930s, and these names have become widely known and used. According to this almanac, as the full Moon in September – the Algonquin tribes in what is now the northeastern U.S. called this the Corn Moon, as this was the time for gathering their main staple crops of corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice.