TYLER, Texas — Organizer Marie Kondo's method of 'Tidying Up' has sparked a decluttering phenomenon since its debut on Netflix earlier this month. 

Kondo's Konmari Method is helping people organize their homes by only keeping items that spark joy. Turns out, the series is inspiring East Texans to tidy up too. 

"There's at least four or five people a day that I talk to just based on this," Hangers of Hope employee Jason Ellis said.

Employees at Tyler thrift store, Hangers of Hope, said they're seeing an unusual increase in donations due to the show. 

"Tyler has always been generous with their donations to Hangars of Hope, but I think with the phenomenon that's going on online, it's getting everyone else excited about organizing their stuff at home," Hangers of Hope employee Joanna Leath said. 

Now, people are bringing in more items that tend to cause clutter.

"You know, clothes or extra dishes that they might have. Things like that," Leath said.

Tyler Professional Organizer Martha Dunlap said it's important to tidy up daily, especially in areas the whole family uses.

"We find ourselves wasting time as a result of trying to find something that we need for a meeting or a matching sock for a soccer game or whatever," Dunlap said.

Dunlap owns Divide and Conquer. She's been helping East Texans remove clutter for 14 years.

According to Dunlap, people should get rid of what they don't need and store items they no longer use regularly away from prominent places.

"I dealt with a lady one time who had her Christmas dishes to the right of the sink, right by the dishwasher. I asked her, how often do you use your Christmas dishes?"

Dunlap said the most important tip she has for folks is to reorganize each space gradually. 

"You are attacking your clutter. So, you need to just do a little bit at a time," Dunlap said.